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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
. two years ago a fruit vendor in 2 nietzsche -- in tunisia set himself on fire, starting the arab spring. thousands took to the streets to protest against the killings, and the prime minister has responded, promising he would form a new government. >> he who is the country's first political assassination since the revolution, and it has exposed intrenched divisions and powerful and distrust. crowds of opposition supporters gathered at the interior ministry and tried to storm the building. they blamed the islamist-led government. these are the streets where protests brought down the dictatorship two years ago. eyewitnesses say when the police responded there was panic and chaos. >> police tried to absorb the anger of the demonstrators, but they could not just watch people throwing stones at them. >> he was the leader of a small party and a fierce critic of the largest party in the government coalition. he was shot dead by a man on a motorbike as he left home. he denounced it as an act of terror. it is unlikely to satisfy the dead man's supporters, who say he received repeated death
zero years since tunisia celebrates the transparent election, the first since the uprising of 2011. that election made to miyisha somewhat of a beacon -- made tunisia somewhat of a beacon. the islamist party merged, but without a majority. they promised cooperation. it seemed to nietzsche -- tunisia was finding a way to compromise. will today's assassination derails the emerging democracy? >> this is the most difficult process of the change, and the new political system has been put together. the new constitution, the divisions between where the country is going, the maneuvering, but generally things are heading in the right direction. >> even so, this will put fear into the heart of the political lives. tonight they called elections. it is a reminder that even the most hopeful of arab democracies remains a work in progress. >> i spoke to michelle. she is the director of the council at the middle east center. we have one of the country's best his the most -- countries that is the most westernized is the most stable. it is a surprise? >> assassination has not been a feature of the t
>> more protester underway in tunisia -- protests are underway in tunisia. the other stories on al jazeera, as french forces in mali push north towards algeria, violence erupts in the capital. >> i am in brussels. after talks lasting through the night, we now have a draft proposal for the eu budget. many more hours ahead before a deal is finally done. >> nasa's curiosity rover gets down to work on the red planet. thousands of tunisians are gathering in their capital for the from -- funeral of a prominent opposition leader. shape -- shokri belaid was shot in front of his home. he was one of the government's fiercest critics. some are putting the blame on the ruling party. hashemi behar a -- hashem able horror -- haitian -- hashem ahelbarra is live with more. >> there are protests across the country and symbolic ceremonies paying tribute to the opposition leader. we are expecting the funeral to start anytime soon. the procession will be in the capital where he will be laid to rest. people are concerned about potential clashes with supporters of the government and supporters of the op
television in america and around the globe. two years ago a fruit vendor in 2 nietzsche -- in tunisia set himself on fire, starting the arab spring. thousands took to the streets to protest against the killings, and the prime minister has responded, promising he would form a new government. >> he who is the country's first political assassination since the revolution, and it has exposed intrenched divisions and powerful and distrust. crowds of opposition supporters gathered at the interior ministry and tried to storm the building. they blamed the islamist-led government. these are the streets where protests brought down the dictatorship two years ago. eyewitnesses say when the police responded there was panic and chaos. >> police tried to absorb the anger of the demonstrators, but they could not just watch people throwing stones at them. >> he was the leader of a small party and a fierce critic of the largest party in the government coalition. he was shot dead by a man on a motorbike as he left home. he denounced it as an act of terror. it is unlikely to satisfy the dead man's supporters,
is on edge today. riot police in egypt and tunisia, bracing for more violence. protests have been happening there as you can see after friday prayers following the assassination after popular opposition leader in tunisia. remember, that was the birthplace of the arab spring two years ago. fox's's conor powell is live from jerusalem. conor, do we know why this tunisian opposition leader was murdered? >> reporter: he was an outspoken critic of the ruling muslim brotherhood party in tunisia. he was a leading figure in the arab spring revolution two years ago. on wednesday he was gunned down by an unknown assailant in front of his house. recently a muslim cleric in tunisia called for a -- his supporters turned out in thousands for his death. blamed the ruling muslim government for his death. although the tunisia prime minister denies it. he promised a full investigation and to catch those responsible for the murder. alisyn: do we have answer wlormt this assassination will spark more violence? >> reporter: we've already seen three days of violence and protest in tunisia and clashes with the poli
that would have been a man, a shopkeeper self-taught and leading into tunisia. the best thing you can do is expect it might ignite at any time and to get ahead of it. so to get our friends in the middle east to reform before the people were in the streets was always trying to get ahead of what happened ultimately and egypt a and tunisia and other places to respect talk about the collapse of the soviet union in terms of what the scholars knew. you were right there. >> i was. we used to laugh when people would say that gorbachev is bound to fall from power. thank you. but when, this was the issue because, the general sense that things are going bad is not enough. people knew that the infrastructure, the political, economic, social soviet union was weak. i went to the soviet union the first time in 1979 to study language. i was there for an extended period of time and i was a student of the soviet military. i remember thinking i had this image of the soviet military as 10 feet tall. and i remember going into a store to buy some little thing for my family, and they were doing the computation
's still in tunisia. >> that doesn't sound like a gu system of working with our partners. >> it shows the tu nearbiens are working within their rule of law. >> we have a suspect in the attack on benghazi. they didn't give us access to him and we don't have any information from him. >> we work with our port naers across the board. when they are able to detain individuals according to their laws we work to see if we can have the ability to ask them questions, sometimes indirectly, and sometimes directly. >> so your point is that tunisian law did not allow them to hold them and therefore they let him go before we could -- >> and we didn't have anything on him either because if we did, then we would have made a point to the tunisians to -- >> what role should the cia play in interrogations? >> cia should be able to lend its full expertise as it does right now in terms of in support of military interrogations, fbi debriefings and interrogations and our foreign partner debriefings. >> what's the best setting to do that? a terrorist is captured and we think we can obtain information from the
, and he was briefly held by tunisia. take a listen to this. >> tunisians did not have a basis in their law to hold him. >> so they released him. >> they did. >> where is he? we don't know. >> he's still in tunisia. >> that doesn't sound like a good system of working with our foreign partners. >> it shows the tunisians are working with their rule of law like we do. >> i know mr. rubio wants to sound ready for responsibility and if he's got some very strong testicles, but dismissing the rules and practices of a foreign nation, that's hardly the most mature way to approach international terrorism, is it? >> oh, martin, that's poppycock. come on. we should have been able to force the tunisian government to do exactly what we wanted them to do. >> we're not even in any kind of conflict with the tunisian -- >> i'm kidding, of course. while marco rubio was trying and similarly we saw this in the hearing with hillary clinton, he was trying very hard to show that he is in command of the facts and he is ready to be, you know, presidential and handle this kind of information, and, instead, what he ac
... could've had a v8. >>> in tunisia right now, shock and angry protests after an outspoken opposition leader is gunned down. kate's here, she's got that and more of the top stories, kate? >> another story that's really troubling. a popular public figure and critic of tunisia's islamic-led government was according to an eyewitness, shot and killed as he left for work this morning. outraged protesters filled the streets and there were violent clashes with police. tunisia's prime minister condemned the assassination, saying the real target is, in his words, quote, the tunisian revolution as a whole. >>> also in germany, germany's education minister has been stripped of her ph.d in an embarrassing case of plagiarism, if you can even believe it, and she's the second minister in chancellor angela merkel's cabinet to face these allegations. the university awarded the minister the highest honors for her doctoral thesis, which one says has many plagiarized passages. >>> and just days after king richard iii's remains were identified underneath a parking lot in england, a battle is shaping up. w
everyone. breaking news from tunisia this morning, more than 1 protesters have filled the streets in front of the interior ministry in the wake of the opposition leader. shot outside his home wednesday morning. he had recently formed a coalition of the communist governor of tune easetunisia. he had a backing of support and people are filling the streets shouting shame and the government should fail. two years ago, tunisia was the first country to overthrow its leader marking the start of the arab spring. the president is facing tough questions on drones after a leaked secret memo described using them to kill u.s. citizens. the paperif there is no specific informing about that attack. in reality, most of this information is already public as of last year. but many find it disturbing especially considering there is not much legal justification for using drones against american citizens. this now complicates the hearing of john brennan for confirmation as director of the cia. we are right back. (vo) this afternoon, current tv is the place for compelling
future attacks being planned by the same people because we never got a chance to talk to him. tunisia said their laws would not let them hold him. that is an excuse we've heard in other pats of the world. that doesn't concern you? >> we press our partners in foreign government to hold individuals and to allow us access to it. sometimes their laws do not allow that to happen. i think the united states government has to respect these governments right to, in fact, enforce their laws appropriately. we don't want to have these individuals being held in some kind of custody that is extra judicial. >> thank you. >> senator warner. >> thank you. thank you mr. brennan, for your testimony today. i think what we've heard from a number of colleagues and we had this discussion when we discussed the committee study. how could be confirmed -- i'm-- how do you ensure that the c.i.a. director is going to be well-informed. particularly to -- we have questioned you about a number of key sensitive programs. the agency is in a lot of these programs that there needs to be some ability to measure objective
they did. he is still in tunisia. it shows the two nations are working with the rule of law, just like we do. >> we have someone who is a suspect in the potential attack on benghazi and did not give us access to him, and we don't have any information. >> we work with our partners across the board. when they can detain individuals according to their laws, we were to see if we have the ability to ask some questions, sometimes directly and sometimes indirectly. >> but the tunisian law did not allow them to hold them so they let them go? >> and we did not have anything on him, either. if we did, we would have made the point for them to turn them over to us. the cia should be able to lend its full expertise as it does right now in terms of and support a military interrogations', fbi, and foreign partner of the briefings. they do that on a regular basis. >> what is the best setting? a suspected terrorist is captured and we think we can obtain information from them, where the suggest they be taken? what is the right setting? >> there are many options. sometimes with foreign partners, they put th
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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